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Blog posts tagged with 'Rich Content'

Being "Mobile Minded"

The way readers consume news has changed. Media companies must change the way they write and deliver content to address this new trend.

In 2010, the Financial Times had no mobile audience. Four years later, more than 60% of FT readers access its content via mobile devices. And, in a recent survey of U.S. consumers conducted by the Associated Press and the American Press Institute, 78% say they used their smartphones to get news during the past week.

Some people, especially those in the 18-34 age group, prefer mobile devices as their exclusive source for news content. These mobile-only audiences tend to fall into two camps:

  • Busy on-the-go news readers who want something to look at while standing in line or sitting at a coffee shop.
  • In-depth news readers who check their smartphones several times a day looking for new or engaging content to delve into.

Media companies around the world are discovering that mobile audiences consume news differently than desktop and print readers. Effective engagement with mobile readers requires a writing style that is appropriate for the smaller screens and larger distractions that characterize today’s in-motion lifestyle. So, with these hurried, harried, and often upperwardly mobile users in mind, here are some tips on writing news content for this cherished audience segment:

1. Provide maximum information with minimum words.

Make every word count. Cut out the fluff and get to the point. Use short, tight sentences, and remove every superfluous word.

2. Create attention-grabbing titles.

Keep your titles brief, relevant, and descriptive. Avoid jargon. And, aim for a length of 65-70 characters max to avoid truncation.

3. Focus on strong introductions and compelling summaries.

Mobile audiences have no time for introductions that dance around a topic. So, just get to it.

4. Use the medium to benefit your message.

Some mobile devices – especially newer smartphones and tablets – are optimized for images. Take advantage of these visual capabilities by using graphics and images to complement your writing.

5. Lists and links are the lifelines of an effective mobile story.

Mobile readers love lists. Ordered or unordered lists; it doesn’t matter. Lists are succinct and easy to read.

When it comes to daily news consumption, we’ve crossed a significant threshold. People now spend more media time each day with their mobile devices than with their desktops, laptops, or printed newspapers.

For the full article and all the juicy content we left out, click HERE!

Zachary T. Brown
Marketing Director
StormsEdge Technology

Hassle Free Social Media Practices

Social media occupies our everyday lives, providing opportunities and distractions in equal measures. How can our audiences use social media to save time and stay connected while reducing the time social media takes up?

Everything we create and post online should be social. In addition to the thousands of news and gossip articles published every day, we have even more content to engage with than ever, as there are several responses left by users and followers, which can be controversial and amusing.

Ordinary people and those who are more prominent don’t seem to hold back. For me, comments left on an article can provide as much, if not more, entertainment than the original article itself. 

If you think about it, it is the subjective nature of news content that sparks discussions either on the publication’s own Web site or off the back of their social media posts. This is where a user’s activity will be seen by followers — people who are more likely to respond to someone they are connected with and further engage in the discussion.

Newspaper and magazine editors are “content editors.” They ensure that everything they publish is easy to find, has embedded links, is shareable, and looks great across multiple platforms and devices.

This means that a wider skill set is needed for success, which has called for new talent within organizations, regardless of the size.

After all, with the print medium declining year after year, there is a need to safeguard businesses by reaching new audiences and having a strategy to get eyeballs on the content and, over time, increasing the number of followers and interactions with content.

You can probably gather from this post that, while social media can extend audience reach and interaction from personal and business points of view, it can be very time-consuming and tricky to stay front-of-mind and relevant. This is true whether you are running a national newspaper or a cafe in a little town across the country.

To make this easier, here are five hassle-free social media tips that will save you time:

  1. Use RSS feeds that connect to Twitter and Facebook so that each time you post on your blog or Web site, the content appears on your social networks straight away.
  2. Set up Facebook and Instagram links and statuses so they are automatically tweeted.
  3. Upload your Instagram photos to an album on Facebook so your fans and friends can see what you’re up to.
  4. Welcome new members and followers. This is especially good for small groups.
  5. Finally, ensure you activate all social networks by syncing them to different devices.

Zachary T. Brown
Marketing Director
StormsEdge Technology

Make Them Sticky

Change is tough. That's why most people resist it – no matter the cost. So, how do you get people to change their way of thinking and switch from a competitor's product to yours?

1. Start small, and communicate clearly

When you're encouraging a customer to switch brands—whether it's his laundry detergent or SUV—you're asking for the same thing: change. And according to human nature, the best change is closest to no change at all.

2. Change one thing at a time

The next step is to focus on changing one behavior at a time—to make it seem as if you are "shrinking the change." For a change to be implemented successfully, a business must change the situation, while being cautious of how quickly the change is taking place. Remember that old saying, the slow and steady win the race?

3. Connect with consumers

Instead of focusing on industry competition, start by focusing your attention on the customers experience and needs. Putting your consumers' needs, desires and feelings first works. If you tug at your customers' emotions, their minds will soon follow. Connect to them on a level that resonates with them whether through pictures, testimonies, or even personal slogans.

Creating change isn't easy. But with letting some basic principles guide your efforts, creating campaigns that stick with your customers is inevitable—and simpler than ever. For a more in-depth read, click HERE!

Zachary T. Brown
Marketing Director
StormsEdge Technology

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