The Unseen Identity Theft - Part 1

In February 2005, Joe Lopez, a businessman from Florida, filed a law suit against Bank of America after unknown hackers stole $90,000 from his Bank of America account and finding it had been transferred to Latvia.

An investigation showed that Mr. Lopez's computer was infected with a malicious program, Backdoor: Core flood, which records every keystroke and sends this information to malicious users via the Internet. This is how the hackers got hold of Joe Lopez's user name and password, since Mr. Lopez often used the Internet to manage his Bank of America account.

However the court did not rule in favor of the plaintiff, saying that Mr. Lopez had neglected to take basic precautions when managing his bank account on the Internet: a signature for the malicious code that was found on his system had been added to nearly all antivirus product databases back in 2003.

Joe Lopez's losses were caused by a combination of overall carelessness and an ordinary keylogging program.

About Keyloggers

The term 'keylogger' describes the program's function. Most sources define a keylogger as a software program designed to secretly monitor and log all keystrokes. This definition is not altogether correct, since a keylogger doesn't have to be software – it can also be a device. Keylogging devices are much rarer than keylogging software, but it is important to keep their existence in mind when thinking about information security.

Legitimate programs may have a keylogging function which can be used to call certain program functions using "hotkeys," or to toggle between keyboard layouts (e.g. Keyboard Ninja). There is a lot of legitimate software which is designed to allow administrators to track what employees do throughout the day, or to allow users to track the activity of third parties on their computers. However, the ethical boundary between justified monitoring and espionage is a fine line. Legitimate software is often used deliberately to steal confidential user information such as passwords.

Most modern keyloggers are considered to be legitimate software or hardware and are sold on the open market. Developers and vendors offer a long list of cases in which it would be legal and appropriate to use keyloggers, including:

  • Parental control: parents can track what their children do on the Internet, and can opt to be notified if there are any attempts to access websites containing adult or otherwise inappropriate content;
  • Jealous spouses or partners can use a keylogger to track the actions of their better half on the Internet if they suspect them of "virtual cheating";
  • Company security: tracking the use of computers for non-work-related purposes, or the use of workstations after hours;
  • Company security: using keyloggers to track the input of key words and phrases associated with commercial information which could damage the company (materially or otherwise) if disclosed;
  • Other security (e.g. law enforcement): using keylogger records to analyze and track incidents linked to the use of personal computers;
  • Other reasons.

However, the justifications listed above are more subjective than objective; the situations can all be resolved using other methods. Additionally, any legitimate keylogging program can still be used with malicious or criminal intent. Today, keyloggers are mainly used to steal user data relating to various online payment systems, and virus writers are constantly writing new keylogger Trojans for this very purpose.

Furthermore, many keyloggers hide themselves in the system (i.e. they have rootkit functionality), which makes them fully-fledged Trojan programs.

As such programs are extensively used by cyber criminals, detecting them is a priority for antivirus companies. Kaspersky Lab's malware classification system has a dedicated category for malicious programs with keylogging functionality: Trojan-Spy. Trojan-Spy programs, as the name suggests, track user activity, save the information to the user's hard disk and then forward it to the author or 'master' of the Trojan. The information collected includes keystrokes and screen-shots, used in the theft of banking data to support online fraud.

Why keyloggers are a threat

Unlike other types of malicious program, keyloggers present no threat to the system itself. Nevertheless, they can pose a serious threat to users, as they can be used to intercept passwords and other confidential information entered via the keyboard. As a result, cyber criminals can get PIN codes and account numbers for e-payment systems, passwords to online gaming accounts, email addresses, user names, email passwords etc.

Once a cyber criminal has got hold of confidential user data, s/he can easily transfer money from the user's account or access the user's online gaming account. Unfortunately access to confidential data can sometimes have consequences which are far more serious than an individual's loss of a few dollars. Keyloggers can be used as tools in both industrial and political espionage, accessing data which may include proprietary commercial information and classified government material which could compromise the security of commercial and state-owned organizations (for example, by stealing private encryption keys).

Keyloggers and phishing are currently the main methods being used in cyber fraud. Users who are aware of security issues can easily protect themselves against phishing by ignoring phishing emails and by not entering any personal information on suspicious websites. It is more difficult, however, for users to combat keyloggers; the only possible method is to use an appropriate security solution, as it's usually impossible for a user to tell that a keylogger has been installed on his/ her machine. According to Cristine Hoepers, the manager of Brazil's Computer Emergency Response Team, which works under the aegis of the country's Internet Steering Committee, keyloggers have pushed phishing out of first place as the most-used method in the theft of confidential information. What's more, keyloggers are becoming more sophisticated – they track websites visited by the user and only log keystrokes entered on websites of particular interest to the cyber criminal.

In recent years, we have seen a considerable increase in the number of different kinds of malicious programs which have keylogging functionality. No Internet user is immune to cyber criminals, no matter where in the world he/she is located and no matter what organization they work for.

Zachary T. Brown
Marketing Director
StormsEdge Technology

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