The Unseen Identity Theft - Part 2

How cyber criminals use keyloggers

One of the most publicized keylogging incidents recently was the theft of over $1million from client accounts at the major Scandinavian bank Nordea. In August 2006 Nordea clients started to receive emails, allegedly from the bank, suggesting that they install an antispam product, which was supposedly attached to the message. When a user opened the file and downloaded it to his/ her computer, the machine would be infected with a well known Trojan called Haxdoor. This would be activated when the victim registered at Nordea's online service, and the Trojan would display an error notification with a request to re-enter the registration information. The keylogger incorporated in the Trojan would record data entered by the bank's clients, and later send this data to the cyber criminals' server. This was how cyber criminals were able to access client accounts, and transfer money from them. According to Haxdoor's author, the Trojan has also been used in attacks against Australian banks and many others.

On January 24, 2004 the notorious Mydoom worm can cause a major epidemic. MyDoom broke the record previously set by Sobig, provoking the largest epidemic in Internet history to date. The worm used social engineering methods and organized a DoS attack on www.sco.com; the site was either unreachable or unstable for several months as a consequence. The worm left a Trojan on infected computers which was subsequently used to infect the victim machines with new modifications of the worm. The fact that MyDoom had a keylogging function to harvest credit card numbers was not widely publicized in the media.

In early 2005 the London police prevented a serious attempt to steal banking data. After attacking a banking system, the cyber criminals had planned to steal $423 million from Sumitomo Mitsui's London-based offices. The main component of the Trojan used, which was created by the 32-year-old Yeron Bolondi, was a keylogger that allowed the criminals to track all the keystrokes entered when victims used the bank's client interface.

In May 2005 in London the Israeli police arrested a married couple who were charged with developing malicious programs that were used by some Israeli companies in industrial espionage. The scale of the espionage was shocking: the companies named by the Israeli authorities in investigative reports included cellular providers like Cellcom and Pelephone, and satellite television provider YES. According to reports, the Trojan was used to access information relating to the PR agency Rani Rahav, whose clients included Partner Communications (Israel's second leading cellular services provider) and the HOT cable television group. The Mayer company, which imports Volvo and Honda cars to Israel, was suspected of committing industrial espionage against Champion Motors, which imports Audi and Volkswagen cars to the country. Ruth Brier-Haephrati, who sold the keylogging Trojan that her husband Michael Haephrati created, was sentenced to four years in jail, and Michael received a two-year sentence.

In February 2006, the Brazilian police arrested 55 people involved in spreading malicious programs which were used to steal user information and passwords to banking systems. The keyloggers were activated when the users visited their banks' websites, and secretly tracked and subsequently sent all data entered on these pages to cyber criminals. The total amount of money stolen from 200 client accounts at six of the country's banks totaled $4.7million.

At approximately the same time, a similar criminal grouping made up of young (20 – 30 year old) Russians and Ukrainians was arrested. In late 2004, the group began sending banking clients in France and a number of other countries email messages that contained a malicious program – namely, a keylogger. Furthermore, these spy programs were placed on specially created websites; users were lured to these sites using classic social engineering methods. In the same way as in the cases described above, the program was activated when users visited their banks' websites, and the keylogger harvested all the information entered by the user and sent it to the cyber criminals. In the course of eleven months over one million dollars was stolen.

There are many more examples of cyber criminals using keyloggers – most financial cybercrime is committed using keyloggers, since these programs are the most comprehensive and reliable tool for tracking electronic information.

Increased use of keyloggers by cyber criminals

The fact that cyber criminals choose to use keyloggers time and again is confirmed by IT security companies.

Reports note that in recent years, the company VeriSign has seen a rapid growth in the number of malicious programs that have keylogging functionality.

One report issued showed that almost 50% of malicious programs detected by the company's analysts during the past year do not pose a direct threat to computers, but instead are used by cyber criminals to harvest personal user data.

According to research conducted by John Bambenek, approximately 10 million computers in the US alone are currently infected with a malicious program which has a keylogging function. Using these figures, together with the total number of American users of e-payment systems, possible losses are estimated to be $24.3 million.

Most modern malicious programs are hybrids which implement many different technologies. Due to this, any category of malicious program may include programs with keylogger functionality.

Zachary T. Brown
Marketing Director
StormsEdge Technology

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